Tag Archives: Canberra

Canberra, ACT, Australian Capital Territory, local, community, hospitality, etc.

The three E’s of social media: Educate, entertain and engage

The first time I heard about the three E’s was when I was interning with Ivy Social. I attended Social School, which is a workshop hosted by the legendary Queens of Ivy Social and Good Day PR, focusing on all things social media. I had already learned so much in the first few weeks of my internship but this? This really laid the foundations for me (…and everyone else in attendance).

All too often, we’re seeing brands being on Facebook or Instagram just for the sake of it or because they think they have to be… which, to be honest, isn’t ideal in any shape or form. It’s like playing professional tennis and knowing that the backhand is one of the strokes you can use but not fully understanding how really important it is in the game. If you know just how critical your backhand is, then wouldn’t you train yourself to have a killer one and in turn, get pretty far in a tournament? Yes, yes you would. 🎾

Think of social media like you think of tennis. When you play tennis, you need to understand the game, its rules and the purpose of each stroke in order to get to a particular place, where you’ll likely reap the benefits – social media is no different.

…yeah, I just tried to use tennis as a metaphor. 😂


Educate

No matter your industry, your business, your brand, your personality; you have something to offer. So, why not share it?

Why not educate your audience?

Why not show them that you know what you’re talking about?

Why not tell them why you do what you do?

Don’t get me wrong, you have a product or service to sell. That’s important. The reality is that your audience isn’t going to care, they’re not going to listen to you, they’re not going to use your product or service if all you do is sell, sell and always sell. People don’t always like being marketed to so be creative in how you do it through all the platforms available to you.

For example, one of my clients is a sports technology company with the vision to help athletes reach their goals and become their best through velocity-based training. Rather than consistently sell their product to our audience, we tell them about this type of training and how this product can help them. ⚡️

Why? Because not every athlete is going to understand velocity-based training, let alone the purpose of this particular device. So, we provide valuable content that people are likely to read. The idea is that it gets them thinking about how they train, which leads to them considering purchasing the device, which results in a positive experience that they share with others.


Entertain

I’ll keep this one short and sweet: don’t be boring. 💥

The easiest way to do this is to make use of what each platform offers you. Use photos and videos but make them interesting by putting your brand personality at the forefront of all that you do. Use polls, ask questions – use it all if you really want to!

Take Public Bar as an example. It’s just another bar in Canberra, right? I’m clearly biased but I think it’s one of the best bars in town. There are so many great qualities to the place but the downside is that the hospitality industry here is booming. At the surface, every bar in Canberra is just like the next one: an awesome set of staff, cool cocktails, great wine list, delicious food – even Happy Hour. Everyone has Happy Hour. You just need to dig a little deeper and pull out that brand personality that I keep going on about.

If you humanise your business, you’ll connect with your loyal customers or reach a new pool of people that are likely to convert into loyal customers.

So, how do I do this with Public?

  1. I put names to faces, especially the staff that have been working there for years. People love to see people that they recognise. Actually, they love to see people in general.
  2. I create a subtle and friendly competition between two managers using the polls feature on Instagram. I’ve asked who does better latte art or who’s going to make the most Espresso Martinis. People froth over this kind of stuff.
  3. I write captions in a conversational manner. Similar to my last blog post, ‘How to write content for social media’, steer clear from one-liners (…because they’re boring).

Find ways to entertain your audience to keep them looking for more instead of feeling like they’re constantly being sold to.


Engage

Given that social media is actually called social media, then it makes all the sense in the world to do just that: be social. Surprisingly enough, there are businesses out there who receive a decent amount of comments and don’t respond to them. 🚫

Would you ignore a compliment in person?

What about a complaint?

How about a question?

Would you ignore a customer?

No, you wouldn’t. And you definitely shouldn’t. The same goes for your online activity. Respond to every comment, like every photo you’re mentioned or tagged in – you can even share photos to your Instagram stories if you want to. The more you engage, the more a platform likes you, the more your content is visible, the more people see your stuff, the more you grow. Get it now? 🙌


Just like your backhand in tennis, the three E’s of social media will get you to a place where you continuously progress. If you educate your audience, entertain and engage with them – then your presence will soar.

Give love, get love

While social media has changed the way we do our marketing, it’s pretty easy to get caught in the more obvious metrics like, “How many followers do I have? How many likes did yesterday’s post get?”.

Don’t get me wrong, they sure do have a role to play but if that’s all you’re measuring, then I’m here to tell you that there’s a lot more to social media than you think (..take it from someone who’s learned this in the last year). The thing about social media is that all the little things contribute to the big things. Seriously, think about it. 🤔

Your account grows because more people see your content.

How? Because it’s showing up in their feeds and they’re intrigued.

Why is it showing in their feeds? Because you’re providing quality content and engaging with your audience.

So? By doing this, you’re working with the algorithm. You’re doing things that it likes.

Then what? The algorithm pushes your content out further.

Where? To more people.

Do you see how it’s an ongoing cycle? ♻️

As I write this, Public has 4,673 Facebook page likes and 1,789 Instagram followers. Not bad, right? It’s higher than some of our competitors and lower than others but the thing I pride myself on? We’ve got an incredible engagement rate. For example, the reopening announcement post was published a few days before the big day and it reached 9,000 people and generated slightly below 2,000 engagements collectively between the two platforms. Mind. Blown. 💥

That one post? It resonated with people because it was relevant to the community. Public had temporarily closed throughout COVID so the announcement was very exciting to the Canberra community – not just to people but to businesses too. There’s a human connection (..despite Public being a business).

That one post? It was more important to get our message out by telling our audience how Public would operate with this stage of restrictions… but that didn’t stop me from tapping into their emotions, even in the slightest bit. By ending the caption with “We’ve missed you Canberra and we look forward to welcoming you back very soon. 💚, it was the easiest and most effective way to connect with our audience. Again, human connection.

That one post? I opted for a team photo because that loyal community we’ve already built and maintained? They’re the ones who already know who we are and what we do. For some, they’re used to seeing our faces on a regular basis. They missed us too. Another human connection.

Since then, Public’s social media presence hit a little burst and we continue to see growth in followers and reach. When I took over the marketing, my goal was to build an online presence that would be reflected in the venue. From that one post, we received so many phone calls, emails and DMs on socials to book, even though our capacity is limited.

As it is with anything and everything else; if you put a little love in, you’ll get a litte love out. ✔️

Why I created a social media strategy for Public Bar

If I’ve learned anything from studying, interning and working in the field of marketing for the how-ever-many years… it’s that strategy is everything. ✔️

When I was offered the role of Public Bar‘s Marketing Coordinator, I was over-the-moon about it but I was also quite terrified. Confident (shock me lol), but terrified.

Why, you ask?

Well, this is going to sound super cheesy… but Public has actually been a significant part of my life.

I love working there. I’ve had fun, been angry and cried there. I learned a lot about what it means to respect a complete stranger as they’d often treat us bar staff like dirt. I learned how to control my temper (..sort of, kinda used to be worse 😇). I’ve also met some of the most incredible people while working there.

..should I add that the Venue Manager was (and still is) one of my closest friends at this point?

Plus, he’s one of the owners.

Yep, that’ll do it. Of course I was terrified. 😬

It all happened pretty quickly actually. I had ideas flowing through my head, so I decided to follow one route and roll with it. There you have it – Public’s very first social media strategy (at least I think so, I hadn’t seen any others before). The frequency, messages, images, captions, hashtags… all of the elements that you put into digital marketing was all in my head. Luckily, I had built momentum from my internship at Ivy Social, which helped me a lot.

This worked for a while, and some of it still does despite the number of adjustments we’ve made to accommodate new launches and the new norm.

What became a concern of mine was that I have plans to move interstate after graduating from uni, which means that my time as Public’s Marketing Coordinator would most likely come to an end (..unless my boss lets me work remotely? 😏). I was worried that all the hard work that my boss and I had put in, all the social media presence that we built, all the online relationships I formed for the business, could easily slow down or even worse: come to a complete stop.

And that’s when I decided to put my thoughts onto paper.

This took me a while… five months, to be exact. I don’t even think my boss read the 18-page report from start to finish and to be honest, he didn’t really need to as we had already discussed all of it. He had that much faith in me that he practically gave me full reign of our social media platforms (not that I’ve ever done something without asking or telling him). Bless that human. ❤️

I certainly didn’t create a strategy that would work forever. Social media is an ever-changing environment and the hospitality industry is constantly on-the-go, so I created something that I could continue to build on, and the next person could build on, and the person after that.

Not to mention, I love to watch my friends succeed.. especially when I get to be part of their success.

VP ✨

Ivy Social’s first intern

If you were to ask the people in my life about my self-confidence and self-esteem, I have a feeling that most, if not all, would say that mine are pretty high (..often too high 😂).

To be honest, I’m quite sure of myself and am very confident in what I already know and what I’m comfortable with. For example, I know that I’ve got great time management and can mix a nicely-frothed Espresso Martini at my bar job. But… when UC updated course requirements and incorporated two internships in my double degree – I felt incredibly nervous within seconds.

Why, you ask?

Believe it or not: it’s because I have zero confidence in my interview skills and I know that they’re a first impression. Seriously.

When the time came, I searched through UC’s CareerHub which listed so many possible internships. I wasn’t sure what I was really looking for but I always had an interest in digital marketing (without even knowing it) and got good grades in my communications units.

And then, I stumbled across Ivy Social. Cute name, right? 😍

I looked more into them: “a boutique social media consultancy in Canberra”. I searched for the contact person and she’s someone I went to school with, she was actually in the year above me (classic Canberra). And so, I sent her an email with my expression of interest and resume.

Knowing that I had to do an interview was nerve-racking, but it definitely helped that I sort of knew my potential first internship supervisor. It didn’t feel like such a formal interview either, it felt more like a conversation which flowed nicely. Then and there, we discussed start dates and I was super excited (..internally, I was doing a self-high-five as I hadn’t applied anywhere else 🙏).

Now when it came to the actual internship, it was kinda funny in that they weren’t sure of how to go about training me – I was the first official intern for Ivy Social.

Let me tell you: they absolutely killed it. I learned so much about the ins and outs of social media including the algorithm, paid advertising, writing content for different clients across a number of industries – I’m still learning more about all of these things.

What I loved the most was that in one moment, I could step into the minds of a prestigious car brand, then the solar industry in the next. I never realised how much I’d fall in love with creative writing – all thanks to this opportunity.

The best thing about this internship?

It landed me the role of Social Media Content Coordinator at Ivy Social months later. 🌿

Safe to say that I’ve built – and will continue to build – my self-confidence in a new environment.

VP ✨